We love fish and are so lucky to have such a fabulous fishmonger Veasey & Sons so that we can create new dishes and enjoy old favourites. Today we’re cooking with flounder, roasting it in the oven in a lemon and tamari glaze. The  Platichthys flesus (previously Pleuronectes flesus), also known as: European Flounder or Fluke is an underrated fish. Up to...

Posted on Jul 10 2014 - 9:28am by Anita-Clare Field
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Let’s begin this blog with a poem by poet and Ulster Fry enthusiast Paul McCann; If you come to Belfast, hungry and alone. Have yourself an Ulster Fry and make yourself at home. Buy a bit of bacon and potato bread each day. When you taste a fry up dear, you’ll never go away! The old motto  “Eat breakfast like a King, lunch like a prince and dine like...

We’re back on the road and heading north-west to Liverpool and today we are trying a pan of scouse. Scouse is a lamb or beef stew, the name coming from lobscouse, a stew commonly eaten by sailors in  Northern Europe, which became popular in seaports like Liverpool. The first known use of the term “lobscouse” is in 1706, according to Webster’s dictionary and Thomas Smollet refers to “lob’s course” in 1750. Where the name comes from is uncertain, but there are three theories. The roots of the word...

Welcome to Meat Free Monday and a wonderful Asian inspired salad using one of my favourite ingredients, the daikon radish. Daikon is a winter oilseed radishes from Asia. While the Japanese name daikon has been adopted in English, it is also often known as a Japanese radish, Chinese radish, Oriental radish or mooli (in India and South Asia). Daikon usually have white...

Red Scorpion Fish, known in France as Rascasse (Scorpaena scrofa) is a close edible relative to other species of scorpion fish distributed around the globe, including the lion fish, flatheads, etc. The scorpion fish is called so because it has poisonous spines. But when dead these are easy to remove. One way to avoid handling the fish too much is simply to gut it...

Couscous is a traditional Berber dish made from semolina which is cooked by steaming. It is traditionally served with a meat or vegetable stew spooned over it. Couscous is a staple food throughout North Africa  - Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Mauritania, Libya and the Western Sahara. Couscous served with fish is also a staple food in Western Sicily. Couscous was voted...

I like hot curries, although as my darling wife will tell you, I have grown up and much prefer to taste the wonderful flavours. Of course she is right ( groans) When I cook curry it is always from scratch, the spices are roasted and ground each time and the other ingredients added at appropriate times. We are big fans of curry from the southern regions of India particularly...

Life has been very busy here at Lover of Creating Flavours recently. We thought we’d catch you up with what we’ve been up to. Whilst LOCF continues on its mission to educate and excite readers palates,we continue to experiment in the kitchen devising new recipes to share with you. We made a decision a couple of months ago only to publish five days a week...

 As the time approaches fast for the launch of La PetiteBouchée, our pop up restaurant, in our vintage H van, we’ve been testing out some of our recipes on friends and family. Yesterday, we served Pissaladière, as a starter with a balsamic glaze. This dish is truly a delight. packed with delicious herbs and summery flavours. Many dishes from Provence take their inspiration from Italy, partly because it is right next door. Pissaladière is usually made in a large rectangle like a tart. It’s great with a salad and a glass of...

Posted on Jun 26 2014 - 9:48am by Anita-Clare Field
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Tripe is a meat that a lot of us take issue with, not least me, because I am not a fan of offal of any kind. Tripe is the stomach of a cow. Beef tripe is usually made from only the first three chambers of a cow’s stomach: the rumen (blanket/flat/smooth tripe), the reticulum (honeycomb and pocket tripe), and the omasum (book/bible/leaf tripe). Tripe may also...